Research explores the nature and extent of child sexual abuse in contemporary institutional settings

Research explores the nature and extent of child sexual abuse in contemporary institutional settings

Two new research reports, released by the Royal Commission, suggest that a significant proportion of reports to police of child sexual abuse in institutional settings involved another child as the person of interest.

The research reports, Child sexual abuse in Australian institutional contexts 2008-13: Findings from administrative data and the follow-up study Child sexual abuse in institutional contexts: The reliability of police data, nature and allegations reported to police, and factors driving reporting rates were released today.

Prepared by researchers from the University of South Australia’s Australian Centre for Child Protection and the University of New South Wales’ Social Policy Research Centre, the reports explore the nature and extent of child sexual abuse in contemporary institutional settings.

The reports are based on administrative data from a range of sources including police and education departments.

The research found that police data was the most useful source of information to explore the nature and extent of child sexual abuse in institutional contexts across states and territories.

 "According to this research child sexual abuse committed by other children or young people is a significant issue," Royal Commission CEO Philip Reed said.

 "Along with findings from our case study, this report and follow-up study will help inform recommendations in this area, which will be contained in the Royal Commission’s final report, due to the Australian Government in December."

Read the reports: