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Logan's story

Logan joined a boys’ high school in Sydney half way through his secondary schooling in the early 1980s. He was abused by a senior staff member, Steven Beachley.

‘When it happened the first time I was petrified’, Logan told the Commissioner. ‘Probably I was one of the lucky ones who got away with it before things got worse.’

At the end of a school day Beachley called Logan into a deserted classroom. He accused the 16-year-old of stealing an item from another student. Logan argued his innocence. ‘That’s when he started to get remorseful, and then affectionate.’ Beachley embraced Logan, kissing him and running his hand over Logan’s buttocks. Logan managed to break away. ‘I used the excuse that my mother would be waiting for me to get out. She wasn’t.’

‘I just ran home, I was actually praying in my shoes, “Save me, save me”.’

Logan immediately told his parents what had happened. They had a church connection with a head teacher at the school, Mr Moss, who they phoned for advice. ‘He said, “No problem, leave it with me”.’

A few days later, Logan was called over the public address system and told to go to the room where he had been abused before by Beachley. ‘Straight away I know what I’m up for, what’s going to happen.’

‘He was already there. Once I came into the room he locked the door, closed the blinds, took his suit coat off, took his glasses off, and then started to kiss me on the forehead and run his hands over my back and backside. Again, petrified. And I really don’t know how I got out of that one. I don’t recall.’

When he got home he told his mother that Beachley had abused him again, and that the problem had not stopped. His mother told him that they would contact Mr Moss again. But a few days later the abuse occurred again, for the third time.

‘Then Moss came back and told my parents, “It’s been fixed”. They’ve identified that he’s on anti-depressants … and that he’s sorry for his actions, or whatever.’

Logan began truanting after the sexual abuse, up until the end of the school year. When school started again Logan found he could not concentrate on his studies. ‘I ended up leaving in Year 11. I was told Beachley was being transferred. From memory he was still at the school when I started Year 11. I stayed another couple of months and then I left.’ 

Logan regrets not being able to complete his HSC, but has managed to put the abuse behind him and lead a fulfilling life. He married his girlfriend of many years and had children with her. Logan has built up his own successful business.

‘I think I’m just a strong sort of an individual.’ Logan feels he was protected emotionally by telling his parents about the abuse immediately, and by being believed. ‘I felt like I’d done all I could.’

At the turn of the century Logan took the further step of reporting his abuse to the police. He has been back to the police a number of times. ‘Nothing really happened. Mostly I was just informed, “It’s your word against his”.’

His wife pointed him towards the Royal Commission as another avenue to tell his story. ‘I had in the back of my mind, is he still alive? I don’t know. Just basically seeking closure.’ Investigators were able to tell Logan that Steven Beachley has died.

‘I’ve just recently told my children what happened; to be aware, and report it, let us know. That no one has the right to do anything. Just give them a little bit more information. That it’s okay to come forward and talk to me. “It’s happened to me. Just be aware”.’

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